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Archival ecologies

Archival Ecologies investigates how fires, floods, mold blooms and other ecological events are affecting cultural collections and the artifacts and memories they preserve. As climate change leads to more extreme weather events, the interactions between archives and the environments where they reside are becoming increasingly frequent and fraught. This series tells the stories of such archives, their stewards and their significance for communities at the forefront of climate change.

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Carried by water

Carried by Water explores stories revolving around water as a force of nature, a resource and a pillar of well-being. Season one travels to communities in the Philippines impacted a decade ago by Super Typhoon Haiyan (known locally as Yolanda), which made landfall on November 8, 2013. We explore changing ideas of risk communication and climate adaptation and shed light on the prolonged and often contentious process of disaster recovery.

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Mining for the climate

Mining for the Climate examines the different narratives that are being told about the extraction, production, and development of lithium in the context of a changing climate and global histories of energy extraction. The project surveys and assesses perspectives on this critical mineral from a variety of global, national, and local actors, including government agencies, lithium mining companies, Indigenous groups, farmers and ranchers, and environmental advocates.

About Blue Lab

Launched in 2021 and led by Professor Allison Carruth, Blue Lab is an environmental research, storytelling and art group. Our multidisciplinary team investigates and creates original stories and creative projects about lived experiences of large-scale environmental challenges—from climate change and green energy to multispecies justice and food and water futures.

In this work, we bridge the tools of art and science, research and creative practice, historical knowledge and speculative imagination. Our animating question is how different people make sense of real-time environmental change (and in some cases catastrophic loss) in relationship to intergenerational memories of and future aspirations for the places they love, value and call home.